Monthly Archive:: November 2015

25 Nov 2015

Putting floristic thermophilization in forests into a conservation biology perspective: beyond mean trait approaches

Opinion paper by Frédéric Gosselin, IRSTEA, frederic.gosselin@irstea.fr; UR EFNO, Domaine des Barres, F-45290 Nogent-sur-Vernisson, France Key message The use of mean characteristics of communities to infer absolute species variations may well constitute another “silent clash of paradigms” Austin
25 Nov 2015

Provenance and seed mass determine seed tolerance to high temperatures associated to forest fires in Pinus pinaster

We show that Pinus pinaster provenance affects both seed germination and seedling recruitment after fire. This information is crucial for managers to select the best seed-provisioning populations when implementing reforestation programs to assist the natural post-fire regeneration
25 Nov 2015

Improved models of harvest-induced bark damage

We provide a precise quantitative analysis of the factors at the origin of bark damage during harvesting operations and developed a model able to predict them accurately. The major factors were the distance of trees to skid
23 Nov 2015

Guidelines for reviewing a data paper

Reviewers will carefully consider: (a) the quality of the manuscript, (b) the quality of the data, (c) the data reusability and (d) the relevance of the data set and its potential contribution to the progress of science.
20 Nov 2015

Publishing data papers in Annals of Forest Science: detailed guidelines for a smooth preparation and submission

Annals of Forest Science is proud to announce that a detailed procedure is now available for submitting data papers. The procedure we propose is easy and flexible. It is described in details in the flyer above. Basically,
19 Nov 2015

Ranking very young Pinus radiata families for acoustic stiffness and validation by microfibril angle

  Acoustic techniques can be utilised to rank a large population of young trees for stiffness and stability for breeding purposes. Abstract This study sought to validate new approaches to rapid, very early screening and selection of